Tag: Ämari

Estonian president discusses migration, digital issues with Italian colleague

Estonian President Kersti Kaljulaid met with Italian President Sergio Mattarella on Monday

Estonian President Kersti Kaljulaid on Monday met with Italian President Sergio Mattarella who hosted a lunch in honor of the Estonian head of state in Rome, during which the presidents discussed the migration crisis, opportunities of the digital society and the future of the European Union.

“The fact that hundreds of thousands of migrants from Africa arrive in Italy every year — and for many years in a row — is not Italy’s problem. It is a problem of the whole of Europe and so all of us hold the key to solving the problem. As Italian fighters will protect our airspace in Amari next year, we must also understand joint concerns that are to the south of us. An not only understand them, but also contribute to solving them,” the president said after the meeting.

The heads of state at the meeting focused on discussing the opportunities of the digital society and questions concerning cyber security. Kaljulaid said that many modern dangers do not depend on geography.

“Those risks are similar in Rome and Tallinn and this is why cooperation between countries is important, a good example of which is the participation of Italy in the work of our NATO Cooperative Cyber Defense Center of Excellence (CCDCOE) in Tallinn since its launch,” the president said.

Speaking about the future of the European Union, Kaljulaid first and foremost considered it important that the member states remain united in important questions. “This is our — Estonia’s, and in reality the whole of EU’s — strategic interest. Europe is faced with a number of challenges, but no member state can solve a big problem alone better than together,” Kaljulaid said.

The president on Monday evening will open an exhibition at the Italian National Gallery of Modern Art that will feature the works of Estonian painter Konrad Magi. Kaljulaid on Tuesday will visit three schools in Rome and gift them with reproductions of Magi’s painting “Landscape of Italy. Rome.”

 

Belgian fighters to conduct low-altitude flights in Estonia

A Belgian Air Component (Luchtcomponent) General Dynamics (Lockheed-Martin) F-16AM Fighting Falcon

TALLINN, Oct 02, BNS – Belgian F-16 fighter jets stationed at the Amari air base in northwestern Estonia as part of NATO’s Baltic air policing mission will perform training flights in Estonian airspace from Monday to Friday.

The aircraft are to fly over Estonia in areas of low-altitude flying, at an altitude of at least 152 meters and preferably away from populated areas, spokespeople for the Estonian defense forces told BNS.

NATO member states allocate specific areas of their air space for the training and exercises of the air force, including low-altitude flights. Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania have also allocated specific regions of their air space for low-altitude flying. The flights are performed in agreement with the Estonian Civil Aviation Administration and Estonian Air Navigation Services.

By a decision of the North Atlantic Council, the air forces of NATO member states have been taking turns to perform the air policing mission in the air space of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania since March 2004, when the three Baltic countries joined the NATO.

The Baltic air policing mission is part of the NATO Smart Defense concept, the aim of which is to save the resources of the member states of the alliance by contributing together to different capabilities.

A contingent of the Belgian Air Force took over the Baltic air policing duties performed out of Amari, Estonia on Sept. 5. At present the Baltic air policing mission is performed by U.S. Air Force F-15 fighter jets deployed to Siauliai, Lithuania, and Belgian F-16s at Amari, Estonia.

 

Allied Air Forces complete peacetime drills in Baltics

An E-3D Sentry of 23 Squadron RAF Waddington (image Credit: MoD)

TALLINN, Estonia – NATO’s Allied Air Command at Ramstein, Germany, and the Combined Air Operations Centre at Uedem, Germany, conducted the sixth live-fly exercise Ramstein Alloy on September 26 and 27.

Like during previous sequels, the training drills focused on exercising NATO’s rotational Baltic Air Policing alert aircraft at Šiauliai, Lithuania, and Ämari, Estonia, and regional air forces. The scenarios used to improve the tactics, techniques and procedures are grouped around realistic situations such as identifying and assisting aircraft in distress, simulating aircraft emergencies and immediate responses.

Besides the United States Air Force and Belgian Air Force fighter detachments ensuring the peacetime Baltic Air Policing mission, military aircraft from Estonia, Germany and Lithuania, and were involved. They conducted missions tactically coordinated and controlled by a Royal Air Force AWACS plane, the Baltic Control and Reporting Centre at Karmelava, Lithuania, the Control and Reporting Point at Ämari, Estonia, and elements of the NATO DARS* presently deployed at Lielvarde, Latvia for their deployment exercise Ramstein Dust –II 17.

All Allied personnel involved in Ramstein Alloy 6 both on the ground and in the air demonstrated their professional and competent skills interacting across borders and applying pertinent peacetime routines.

“The goals Allied Air Command set for this exercise were met by all our participants,” said the Ramstein Alloy 6 project officer, Spanish Air Force Major Ildefonso Martinez-Pardo. “We successfully and safely conducted missions like loss of communications, identification of unknown aircraft, aerial manoeuvres among several fighter aircraft, aerial refuelling and the simulated diversion into an alternate airport. I commend my colleagues from Combined Air Operations Centre Uedem for their excellent monitoring, coordinating and facilitating this training event.”

For more than eight years, Allied Air Command has conducted this type of routine life-fly exercises, each time with several Allies showcasing NATO’s peacetime defensive capabilities and commitment to safeguarding its members’ airspace,

* Deployable Air Control Centre, Recognized Air Picture Production Centre/Sensor Fusion Post

Story by Allied Air Command Public Affairs Office

 

Belgian fighters to conduct low-altitude flights in Estonian airspace

Belgian Air Component F-16AM

TALLINN, Sep 25, BNS – Belgian F-16 fighter jets stationed at the Amari air base in northwestern Estonia as part of NATO’s Baltic air policing mission will perform training flights in Estonian airspace from Monday to Friday.

The aircraft are to fly over Estonia in areas of low-altitude flights and will do so at an altitude of at least 152 meters and preferably away from populated areas, headquarters of the Estonian defense forces told BNS.

NATO member states allocate specific areas of their air space for the training and exercises of the air force, including low-altitude flights. Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania have also allocated specific regions of their air space for carrying out low-altitude flights. The flights are performed in agreement with the Estonian Civil Aviation Administration and the air traffic service.

According to a decision of NATO, air forces of NATO member states based on rotation participate in the air policing mission of the Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian air space since March 2004, when the Baltic countries joined the NATO. The Baltic air policing mission is part of the NATO Smart Defense concept, the aim of which is to save the resources of the member states of the alliance by contributing together to different capabilities.

A contingent of the Belgian Air Force took over the Baltic air policing mission from the Spanish Air Force on Sept. 5. At present the Baltic air policing mission is led by U.S. Air Force F-15 fighters deployed to Siauliai, Lithuania, and the Belgian F-16s in Amari, Estonia.

 

NATO Allies scheduled to train Air Policing procedures in Baltic region

A Belgian F-16 fighter aircraft intercepts a Lithuanian C-27 transport aircraft simulating a loss of communications with civilian Air Traffic Control – this will be one of the scenarios conducted during exercise Ramstein Alloy 6 conducted on September 26 and 27 in the Baltic skies. Photo by intercepted courtesy Belgian Air Force

TALLINN, Estonia – Allied aircraft are scheduled to conduct the routine live-fly exercise Ramstein Alloy 6 on September 26 and 27 in the Baltic skies.

On both days, military fighter and support aircraft from Belgium, Estonia, Germany, Lithuania, Poland, the United States and a NATO AWACS will take off from air bases Ämari, Estonia, Siauliai, Lithuania and home bases in Poland and Germany to practice standard routines and procedures. The drills include several scenarios that provide realistic training for NATO Air Policing activities over the Baltic States.

In simulated missions, Allied fast jets will have to locate and intercept a slow moving aircraft or an aircraft that lost radio communications with civilian Air traffic Control agencies. Other missions include air-to-air refuelling by German and United States tanker aircraft.

Luftwaffe Airbus A310 MRRT refuelling Panavia Tornado IDS

The two-day event is overseen by NATO’s Combined Air Operations Centre at Uedem, Germany, while mission control will be provided by an AWACS, the Baltic Control and Reporting Centre at Karmelava, Lithuania, the Control and Reporting Point at Ämari, Estonia, and elements of the NATO DARS* presently deployed at Lielvarde, Latvia.

Planned aerial training is mostly conducted in altitudes above 20,000 feet or 6,000 m, not visible from the ground, and is subject to changes due to unforeseen developments.

The Ramstein Alloy exercise series builds on experience from its predecessor series that started in 2008. Regularly scheduled three times a year, it is a routine training event aimed at further honing skills of highly capable and flexible aircrews and controllers in the field of NATO’s Baltic Air Policing mission.

Story by Allied Air Command Public Affairs Office

 

Belgian fighters to conduct low-altitude flights in Estonian airspace

A Belgian Air Component (Luchtcomponent) General Dynamics (Lockheed-Martin) F-16AM Fighting Falcon

TALLINN, Sep 14, BNS –  Belgian F-16 fighter jets stationed at the Amari air base in northwestern Estonia as part of NATO’s Baltic air policing mission will perform low-altitude training flights in Estonian airspace on Thursday and Friday.

The aircraft are to fly over Estonia in areas of low-altitude flights and will do so at an altitude of at least 152 meters and preferably away from populated areas, headquarters of the Estonian defense forces told BNS.

NATO member states allocate specific areas of their air space for the training and exercises of the air force, including low-altitude flights. Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania have also allocated specific regions of their air space for carrying out low-altitude flights. The flights are performed in agreement with the Estonian Civil Aviation Administration and the air traffic service.

According to a decision of NATO, air forces of NATO member states based on rotation participate in the air policing mission of the Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian air space since March 2004, when the Baltic countries joined the NATO. The Baltic air policing mission is part of the NATO Smart Defense concept, the aim of which is to save the resources of the member states of the alliance by contributing together to different capabilities.

A contingent of the Belgian Air Force took over the Baltic air policing mission from the Spanish Air Force on Sept. 5. At present the Baltic air policing mission is led by U.S. Air Force F-15 fighters deployed to Siauliai, Lithuania, and the Belgian F-16s in Amari, Estonia.

 

NATO fighters to perform training flights in Estonian air space Today

A Belgian Air Component (Luchtcomponent) General Dynamics (Lockheed-Martin) F-16AM Fighting Falcon

F-16 fighter aircraft flown by pilots of the Belgian Air Component stationed at the Amari air base are to carry out training flights above Estonia today.

The aircraft are to fly over Estonia in areas of low-altitude flights and will do so at an altitude of at least 152 meters and preferably away from populated areas, headquarters of the Estonian defense forces told BNS.

NATO member states allocate specific areas of their air space for the training and exercises of the air force, including low-altitude flights. Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania have also allocated specific regions of their air space for carrying out low-altitude flights. The flights are performed in agreement with the Estonian Civil Aviation Administration and the air traffic service.

According to a decision of NATO, air forces of NATO member states based on rotation participate in the air policing mission of the Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian air space since March 2004, when the Baltic countries joined the NATO.

The Baltic air policing mission is part of the NATO Smart Defense concept, the aim of which is to save the resources of the member states of the alliance by contributing together to different capabilities.

A contingent of the Belgian Air Force on September 5 took over the Baltic air policing mission from the Spanish Air Force. At present the Baltic air policing mission is led by U.S. Air Force F-15 fighters deployed to Siauliai, Lithuania, and the Belgian F-16s in Amari, Estonia.

 

Estonia Confirms Arrival of 2 UK Fighter Jets at Amari Air Base – Defense Forces

The Estonian Defense Forces confirmed on Tuesday the arrival of two UK Eurofighter Typhoon fighters at the Amari air base near Tallinn.

The jets arrived in Estonia to support the NATO mission in the Baltic state.

According to the Estonian Defense Forces, the jets will participate in the joint drills with the UK contingent of the NATO battalion deployed in Estonia.

Local media also reported on Tuesday that seven US F-15C Eagle fighters arrived at the air base in the Lithuanian city of Siauliai.

NATO is boosting its presence in the Baltic region on the threshold of the upcoming Russia-Belarusian joint military exercise Zapad-2017 (“West-2017”). On Friday, the Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement that the Western media hype around the Zapad-2017 drills was aimed at justifying the costs of building up NATO’s military activity.

The Zapad-2017 military drills are scheduled for September 14-20. The exercise grounds will stretch from the Kola Peninsula in Russia’s far northwest all the way down to Belarus. About 12,700 servicemen (including 5,500 Russians), about 70 planes and helicopters, up to 680 units of military equipment, including about 250 tanks and 10 ships are expected to take part in the exercise.

 

175th Wing Deployment ÄMARI AIR BASE in Estonia

A-10C 175th Wing Air National Guard. Photo by SMSgt Jim Foard) (RELEASED) Officila Photo by: Jim Foard,SMSgt,,, United States

For just over a week now, ten A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft and approximately 270 Airmen have been stations at Ämari Air Base, Estonia, to participate in a flying training deployment.

The deployment and training efforts are funded by the European Reassurance Initiative as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve, which allows the U.S. to work with allies and partners to develop and improve ready air forces capable of maintaining regional security.

“The long-standing relationship between Estonia and Maryland reinforces U.S. commitment to regional security,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Jason Burns, Bilateral Affairs officer assigned to the Office of Defense Cooperation. “The exercise presents the opportunity for both nations to engage in critical military movements and hone individual skill sets.”

The 175th Cyberspace Operations Group deployed with a Virtual Interconnected Training Environment. The VITE from the 175th Wing, Warfield Air National Guard Base, Maryland, deployed in support of an overseas training exercise for the first time ever.

“The VITE allows us to simulate networks, any network we want, to conduct exercises and training,” said U.S. Air Force Col. Jori Robinson, 175th Cyberspace Operations Group commander. “It allows us to do real world training in a simulated environment where it is safe to conduct these types of exercises.”

During the exercise, the A-10Cs will train with multi-national Joint Terminal Attack Controllers and Combat Control Teams at Amari and Jagala, Estonia.

In addition, an MC-130J Commando II from the 352nd Special Operations Wing, Royal Air Force Mildenhall, United Kingdom, and a combat communications team will deploy from the 435th Air Ground Operations Wing, Ramstein Air Base, Germany.

175th Wing MC-130J Hercules

While deployed, the A-10C’s will also train with the Finnish air force F/A-18 Hornets in Finland, Spanish air force F/A-18 Hornets in Estonia and multinational JTACs in Latvia. Flight operations will take place in Finnish, Estonian, Latvian and international airspace. This training will focus on maintaining joint readiness while building interoperability capabilities.

Spanish Air Force F/A-18 Hornet

“Working with various countries allows us to share and learn new experiences, thoughts and ideas while training for optimal preparedness,” said U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Tony Queen, 175th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron flight chief. “After all, you train the way you fight.”

 

NATO jets in Baltics scrambled 8 times last week to escort Russian aircraft

Ejército del Aire F/A-18C. 5 Spanish Air Force F/A-18Cs make up the Baltic Air Policing element in Estonia, based in Ämari as of 1 May 2017.

VILNIUS – NATO fighter jets serving in the Baltic air policing mission were scrambled eight times last week to intercept Russian military aircraft flying in international airspace over the Baltic Sea, the Lithuanian Defense Ministry said on Monday.

The ministry said that a total of 21 Russian planes were intercepted, around half of which were fighter jets, while the NATO jets also identified several transport and passenger planes over the Baltic Sea.
Most of the Russian aircraft had their automatic transponders switched off, the statement said.

The biggest number of scrambles took place last Thursday, when the alliance’s jets took off three times in total and intercepted ten aircraft.

Polish Air Force F-16C Block 52+ Fighters have been based at Based in Siauliai in Lithuania since May 1 2017.

Airmen deploy to support Estonia FTD

Ten A-10 Thunderbolt IIs, a MC-130J Commando II, and approximately 270 Airmen and associated equipment from bases across the U.S. and Europe will deploy to Amari Air Base, Estonia, Aug. 4-20.

Ten A-10 Thunderbolt IIs, a MC-130J Commando II, and approximately 270 Airmen and associated equipment from bases across the U.S. and Europe will deploy to Amari Air Base, Estonia, Aug. 4-20.
The deployment is funded by the European Reassurance Initiative as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve, which ensures U.S. European Command has a ready persistent rotational presence of American air, land and sea forces in the region.

The A-10s from the 175th Wing, Warfield Air National Guard Base, Md., will train with multinational Joint Terminal Attack Controllers and Combat Control Teams at Amari and Jagala, Estonia.
The MC-130J is from the 352nd Special Operations Wing, RAF Mildenhall, U. K. and a combat communications team will deploy from the 435th Air Ground Operations Wing, Ramstein Air Base, Germany.

While deployed, the A-10s will also train with the Finnish Air Force F/A-18 Hornets in Finland, Spanish Air Force F/A-18 Hornets in Estonia and multinational JTACs in Latvia. Flight operations will take place in Finnish, Estonian, Latvian and international airspace.

This training will focus on maintaining joint readiness while building interoperability capabilities.