Tag: frigate

Frigate Admiral Makarov hits cruise missile simulators in Baltic Sea

Russian Frigate Admiral Makarov

Russia’s frigate The Admiral Makarov of project 1135.6 has successfully hit anti-ship cruise missile simulators with its air defense system Shtil. The firing practice was part of the government acceptance test, the Baltic Fleet’s spokesman Roman Martov told the media.

“The frigate The Admiral Makarov has coped with the task of defending itself from a missile strike with its air defense system Shtil,” Martov said.

Two other Baltic Fleet ships – The Geizer and The Liven – had launched simulators of cruise missiles in the designated area of the Baltic Sea.

“The anti-aircraft missiles fired from The Admiral Makarov successfully hit the air targets,” Martov said, adding that the task was coped with in a complex electronic jamming situation.

The Baltic Sea’s area where the testing was conducted was closed to shipping and civilian aircraft. Ten naval and support ships of the Black Sea fleet cordoned off the area.

The frigate The Admiral Makarov (project 1135.6) began to be built at the Yantar shipyard on February 29, 2012 and set afloat on September 2, 2015.

Ships of this class are meant for resistance to surface ships and submarines and for repelling air raids, on their own or in cooperation with other ships.

They boast universal missile and artillery weapons and advanced radio-electronic equipment for anti-submarine and air defense. Project 1135.6 frigates have a displacement of about 4,000 tonnes, length of 125 meters and speed of up to 30 knots.

 

 

 

Ambitious future for Naval Shipbuilding in the UK

The second Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carrier, HMS Prince of Wales under construction at Rosyth Dockyard

Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon has unveiled an ambitious new National Shipbuilding Strategy which meets the challenge set by Sir John Parker last November and sets out plans for the first batch of Type 31e frigates.

Sir John Parker’s independent report into British naval shipbuilding proposed far-reaching recommendations to transform the UK maritime industry and boost the prosperity of regions, shipyards and maritime supply chains across the country.

Today’s Strategy sees the Government accept Sir John’s recommendations and step up to what he called a prospective ‘renaissance’ in British shipbuilding. Building on the Government’s industrial strategy, it outlines an ambition to transform the procurement of naval ships, make the UK’s maritime industry more competitive, grow the Royal Navy fleet by the 2030s, export British ships overseas, and boost innovation, skills, jobs, and productivity across the UK.

It announces the government’s plan to procure new Type 31e General Purpose Frigates. A price cap has been set of no more than £250M each for the first batch of five frigates. In line with standing UK policy on warships they will be built in the UK. They could be built in a way which could see them shared between yards and assembled at a central hub. The first ships are set to be in service by 2023. Shipyards will be encouraged to work with global partners to ensure the vessel is competitive on the export market.

Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon said:

This new approach will lead to more cutting-edge ships for the growing Royal Navy that will be designed to maximise exports and be attractive to navies around the world.

Backed up by a commitment to spend billions on new ships, our plan will help boost jobs, skills, and growth in shipyards and the supply chain across the UK.

The Strategy sets out the government’s commitment to work with industry to reinvigorate and maximise export success. The Type 31e will be designed to meet the needs of the Royal Navy and with the export market in mind from the beginning. This could see industry’s customer become not only the Royal Navy but for the navies of Britain’s allies and partners.

A computer generated image of one of the proposed designs for the Royal Navy’s Type 31e frigate

The MOD is committed to new ships for the Royal Navy through its rising budget and £178bn equipment plan. In July, at BAE’s Govan shipyard, the Defence Secretary cut steel for the first of eight Type 26 frigates, HMS Glasgow. The £3.7 billion contract for the first three, the largest for naval ships this decade, will secure hundreds of high skilled jobs on the Clyde until 2035 and hundreds more in the supply chain across the UK.

Sir John Parker said:

I am very impressed by the courage that the Secretary of State has shown – and the Government – in adopting my recommendations, which were very extensive, and will change the shape of naval shipbuilding over the country in the future.

The next challenge is to come up with a world-leading design; one that can satisfy the needs of the Royal Navy and the export market. We have the capability to do that, the will is there and it is a tremendous opportunity for UK shipbuilding. I see no reason why industry will not rise to that challenge. There is an incredible keenness from around the country, from Scotland to Merseyside, to the South West and over to Belfast.

The option to build the Type 31e frigates in blocks reflects how the biggest ship ever built for the Royal Navy, the 65,000-tonne HMS Queen Elizabeth, was constructed. The aircraft carrier was built in blocks by over 10,000 people in six main British cities. She was then assembled in Rosyth, before commencing sea trials in June and arriving in her home port of Portsmouth last month.

Her sister ship HMS Prince of Wales, built in the same way, is also now structurally complete and will be officially named in a ceremony on 8 September. This method has also been tried and tested on the UK’s new polar research ship, RRS Sir David Attenborough, with shipyards across the country collaborating in the block build.

The Strategy is an important part of the government’s broader industrial strategy that focuses on increasing economic growth across the country and investing in a more skilled workforce.

The Government will work together with industry to provide the certainty and support the need to become internationally competitive. Such a move will not only boost the British economy and jobs, but it will also help to create a more stable and well-protected world.

 

German frigate FGS Brandenburg concludes NATO SNMG2 deployment

German Navy file photo of FGS Brandenburg

German Navy frigate FGS Brandenburg is on her way home after spending six months as the lead ship of NATO’s Standing Maritime Group 2 in the Aegean Sea.

Brandenburg is set to return to her homeport in Wilhelmshaven on September 8 after an eventful deployment.

The frigate’s mission was to lead a NATO group of ships monitoring and patrolling the Aegean Sea off the Turkish coast.

Another goal was to increase the cooperation between the European border agency Frontex and the maritime authorities of Turkey and Greece. By doing so, NATO hopes to curb the migration flow and smuggling activities in the Aegean Sea.

During her first month on the job, FGS Brandenburg ran aground while departing the port of Piraeus, Greece, colliding with a jetty and sustaining considerable damage.

According to German media, FGS Brandenburg damaged her rudder and both propellers and was only partially operational.

Following the accident, FGS Brandenburg was towed to a Hellenic Navy base in the port of Salamis for repairs.

Brandenburg returned to sea after approximately a month of repairs. The ship ran aground on April 17 and was seen in the Chios Strait in late May.

Taking Brandenburg’s place in another German frigate, F122 Bremen-class frigate FGS Lübeck, which got underway on August 21.

Lübeck is the fifth German Navy ship to be sent to the Aegean Sea since February 2016, when NATO started its contribution to the establishment of a maritime situational awareness in the region.

The flagship for SNMG2 is currently the Royal Navy destroyer HMS Duncan.

 

Defence Minister announces successful first firings of Sea Ceptor missiles to protect new aircraft carriers

The first firings of the new Sea Ceptor air defence system have been successfully conducted in a major milestone for the Royal Navy, Defence Minister Harriett Baldwin announced today.

The Minister visited defence company MBDA’s site in Filton, near Bristol, meeting with local graduates, apprentices and other employees working on the Sea Ceptor system.

The new air missile defence system can intercept and destroy enemy missiles travelling at supersonic speeds and will form part of the protection for the nation’s new aircraft carriers. The first firings were conducted from Type 23 frigate HMS Argyll whilst off the coast of Scotland.

Minister for Defence Procurement Harriett Baldwin said:

“Sea Ceptor will protect our interests against threats both known and unknown. It will launch from the Royal Navy’s new Type 26 frigates as they keep our nuclear deterrent submarines and the UK’s two new aircraft carriers safe on operations around the globe.

Sea Ceptor supports 600 UK jobs and is yet another example of how our rising defence budget is being spent on cutting-edge kit to help our Armed Forces meet future threats.”

The Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Argyll, which fired the Sea Ceptor missiles earlier this Summer.

Sea Ceptor, which uses MBDA’s next-generation Common Anti-air Modular Missile (CAMM), is being fitted to replace the Sea Wolf weapon system on the Type 23 frigates. The air defence system will also be used on the new Type 26 frigates and Land Ceptor, which will replace Rapier for the British Army.

Using innovations in radar and datalink technology that will guide these potent missiles with pinpoint accuracy, Sea Ceptor will provide the Royal Navy with an improved shield against airborne threats such as the new generation of supersonic anti-ship missiles, fast jets, helicopters and unmanned aerial vehicles.

Commander Toby Shaughnessy, the Commanding Officer of HMS Argyll, said:

“This is an exciting upgrade in capability and a great opportunity for HMS Argyll to demonstrate what the missile system can do to protect our ships from future threats.

Sea Ceptor is an impressive and innovative system, demonstrating that the Royal Navy is at the cutting edge of technology and working hard to keep Britain safe. I am immensely proud of my ship’s company and the work they put in to make this test firing possible.”

HMS Argyll will conduct further firing trials of the Sea Ceptor system before she deploys to Japan next year. Alongside providing robust self-defence, importantly Sea Ceptor defends escort vessels within a maritime task group, such as for the new Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers.

One of the Sea Ceptor missiles fired by HMS Argyll earlier this Summer. MBDA Copyright.

The system uses a new UK-developed missile capable of reaching speeds of up to Mach 3 and will have the ability to deal with multiple targets simultaneously, protecting an area of around 500 square miles (1,300 square kilometres) over land or sea.

As part of MBDA’s CAMM programme, Sea Ceptor supports around 600 MBDA jobs and its supply chain in key locations across the UK such as Stevenage, Filton and Bolton.

Tony Douglas, Chief Executive Officer for the MOD’s procurement organisation Defence Equipment and Support, which is based at MOD Abbey Wood in Bristol, said:

“The firings are an important step forward in proving the significant improvements over previous air defence systems and further evidence of our commitment to provide the very best equipment to our armed forces.”

The Defence Minister also visited Airbus’ plant in Filton, near Bristol, which is the heart of the design and manufacture of some of the world’s most technologically advanced aircraft. The Minister met with some of Airbus’ 6000 local employees, including engineers working on research and technology for future aircraft projects.

The news comes after the Defence Minister confirmed a £100m contract to fit the Sea Ceptor system to the Type 26 frigates last year. Earlier this year Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon also announced a £539 million investment in new missiles systems.

 

UK’s Military Promise To Japan Creates New Concerns

Royal Navy Type-23 Frigate HMS Argyll (F231) MoD

LONDON, Sept 2 (Bernama) — British Prime Minister Theresa May has already stirred up new concerns as she headed for home on Friday, wrapping up her three-day Japan tour, China’s Xinhua news agency reported.

At the time when Downing Street needed to reassure East Asia post-Brexit certainty, it was instead signalling uncertainty.

On her trip to Japan, she agreed with her Japanese counterpart, Shinzo Abe, to the deployment of HMS Argyll to the region next year as well as joint training exercises between troops of the two countries.

In her speech Thursday in Tokyo, May said, “We have highlighted our opposition to any actions on the South and East China Seas likely to increase tension.”

People can not help but wondering: how come sending an aircraft carrier by an outsider to the region does not count as an action which increases tension?

The latest promise the British government made to Japan would end up further complicating the situation in the already troubled region and also inviting uncertainty to the country’s relations with China.

The British government’s latest decision could be viewed as another expression of its stubborn determination to meddle in disputes involving China.

Earlier, British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson claimed Britain would send its new aircraft carriers “on a freedom of navigation operation” in the South China Sea. Defense Secretary Michael Fallon echoed that London “won’t be constrained by China from sailing through the region.”

The way the May cabinet woos Japan has created an awkward situation. While it was attempting to demonstrate its closeness to Japan, a major investor in Britain, UK irritated China, an equally and increasingly more important partner.

In the name of security cooperation, Tokyo and London are joining hands. But their cooperation will only lead to some insecurity in the region, simply because this kind of collaboration is not constructive at all.

By doing so, Japan is inviting an outside military force to intervene in the region, which is more of a provocation than cooperation.

In essence, the bilateral cooperation should not be at the cost of sacrificing the security of a third country, in this case China. Otherwise, it can only backfire.

 

NATO Maritime Commander and Frigate Group to visit Helsinki

Standing NATO Maritime Group 1 (SNMG1)

Allied Maritime Command Commander, Vice Admiral Clive Johnstone, will make an official visit to Finland beginning on 24 August 2017.

The visit will be hosted by the Chief of Finnish Navy, Vice Admiral Veijo Taipalus.

In conjunction with the Commander’s visit, Standing NATO Maritime Group 1 (SNMG1) will arrive in Helsinki August 25 for a scheduled port visit as part of the group’s deployment in the Baltic Sea. The group will be hosted by Coastal Fleet.

Finland is one of NATO’s most active partners and a valued contributor to NATO-led operations and missions – it is one of five countries that has enhanced opportunities for dialogue and cooperation with NATO.

The leadership discussions and port visit are a practical outcome of Finnish partnership with NATO in NATO’s Partnership for Peace program. The Commander’s visit allows for discussions on Finland’s maritime cooperation with NATO and the port visit provides an opportunity for sailors from the group to work with their Finnish counterparts to exchange information and enhance interoperability.

During the port visit, the SNMG1 command team will meet with local civilian and military leadership in Helsinki. The port visit is also a great opportunity for the sailors to enjoy a break from operations.

SNMG1 is currently composed of the NATO group flagship, Norwegian frigate HNoMS Otto Sverdrup, Canadian frigate HMCS Charlottetown, Portuguese frigate NRP Francisco de Almeida and German tanker FGS Rhön.

Some of the ships will be open and welcome visitors aboard both Saturday 26 August and Sunday 27 August from 13.00 to 16.00. The ships will be at Hernesaari Quay, Helsinki Harbor, Henry Fordin katu 5.

Security measures during open ship

For security reasons, the following is not allowed to be brought on board:

. Large bags, backpacks etc.

. Weapons or dangerous objects

. Cameras, cell phones, tablets, computers etc

All visitors and their baggage may be subject to search before entry.

 

German F122 frigate ‘Lübeck’ joining NATO’s SNMG2

FGS Lübeck at sea. Photo: German Navy

The German Navy’s F122, Bremen-class frigate FGS ‘Lübeck’ is joining NATO’s Standing Maritime Group 2 in the Aegean Sea.

Setting sail on August 21, Lübeck will be replacing another German ship, F123 frigate FGS Brandenburg, which spent six months as the flagship of the international task group.

Commenting on the deployment, Lübeck’s commander, Frigate Captain Matthias Schmitt, said the ship’s main task will be to support Greek and Turkish authorities and the European border agency Frontex in controlling and preventing human smuggling activities in the Aegean Sea.

Lübeck is expected to reach Turkish waters by the beginning of September when it will take over the duties of FGS Brandenburg after a handover ceremony.

The crew of Lübeck are set to return to their homeport of Wilhelmshaven mid-November.

Returning home in September will be the crew of FGS Brandenburg, the lead ship of the German Navy’s four F123 frigates.

They are completing an eventful deployment which got off to a rather bad start after the ship ran aground in Greece while departing the port of Piraeus. Brandenburg damaged her rudder and both propellers and was sidelined for a month between April and May.

The ship returned to operations with the NATO group, however, completing her scheduled deployment.

 

Royal Canadian Navy ships to conduct operations in Canada’s northern waters

This file photo shows HMCS Montreal passing an iceberg in Strathcona Sound near Nanisivik, Nunavut Territory, during a previous Operation NANOOK. Corporal Rick Ayer / Corporal Rick Ayer

Her Majesty’s Canadian Ships (HMCS) Montréal, Kingston, and Goose Bay have left from their home port of Halifax, NS to conduct operations in northern waters.

During their deployments, Montréal, Goose Bay and Kingston will conduct surveillance in Canada’s northern waters and will visit a number of communities.

HMCS Montréal and HMCS Goose Bay will also participate in Op NANOOK, Canada’s main annual northern military operation, the Royal Canadian Navy noted.

As a part of this year’s Op NANOOK, Montréal and Goose Bay will work together with the Canadian Army, the Canadian Rangers, the Royal Canadian Air Force and other government agencies.

NANOOK started on Aug. 12 and runs until Aug. 27.

 

HMCS Charlottetown supports NATO assurance and deterrence measures on Operation REASSURANCE

HMCS Charlottestown

News Release (UPDATE)

August 8, 2017 – Ottawa – National Defence / Canadian Armed Forces

Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Charlottetown joins Standing NATO Maritime Group One (SNMG1) today on its way to the Mediterranean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean, and Baltic Sea as part of Canada’s support to NATO assurance and deterrence measures in Central and Eastern Europe.

On its second deployment under Op REASSURANCE, HMCS Charlottetown replaces HMCS St. John’s, which arrived in its home port of Halifax on July 17, 2017, after a six-month deployment.

The deployment of HMCS Charlottetown demonstrates Canada’s ongoing commitment to international security and cooperation as part of NATO assurance and deterrence measures in Central and Eastern Europe.

“Canada’s participation in regional maritime security operations as part of NATO assurance activities is another demonstration of Canada’s ongoing commitment to international security and cooperation. The excellent crew of the HMCS Charlottetown is demonstrating our continued leadership on the world stage by making meaningful and enduring contributions to NATO activities in Eastern and Central Europe.”

—    Harjit S. Sajjan, Defence Minister 

“The highly trained and professional ship’s company is well prepared to meet the challenges of this mission. HMCS Charlottetown is committed to further increase the Canadian Armed Forces’ ability to work alongside our Allies, contribute to enhancing NATO readiness, and help strengthen international and regional stability.”

—    Commander Jeff Hutt, Commanding Officer, HMCS Charlottetown

Quick Facts

  • HMCS Charlottetown is a Halifax-class frigate with a crew of approximately 240 personnel of all ranks, including an Enhanced Naval Boarding Party and a CH-124 Sea King helicopter air detachment.
  • The Enhanced Naval Boarding Party provides a relatively new capability for the Royal Canadian Navy that is used in support of maritime interdiction operations.
  • HMCS Charlottetown’s deployment is part of a range of military activities undertaken by the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) to support NATO assurance and deterrence measures through the provision of military capabilities for training, exercises, demonstrations, and assigned NATO tasks and demonstrates Canada’s commitment to promote security and stability in Central and Eastern Europe.
  • During its first deployment in support of Op REASSURANCE, HMCS Charlottetown conducted maritime security operations and joint NATO training exercises between June 2016 and January 2017, in the North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean, Aegean and Baltic Seas, as part of Standing NATO Maritime Group Two (SNMG2).
  • The Standing NATO Maritime Groups are multinational, integrated maritime forces made up of vessels from various Allied countries. These vessels are made available to NATO to perform different tasks ranging from exercises to operational missions. They also help to establish Alliance presence, demonstrate solidarity, conduct routine diplomatic visits to different countries, support partner engagement, and provide a variety of maritime military capabilities to ongoing missions.
  • Commander Jeff Hutt, from Lunenberg, Nova Scotia, has served in the CAF since 1998. After his initial naval training, he was assigned to HMCS Charlottetown and was twice deployed with the ship to the Arabian Sea. On board HMCS Athabaskan, he served in Operation HESTIA, Canada’s response to the earthquake in Haiti. He was Chief of Staff to the Commander of Naval Reserves in Quebec City from July 2015 to December 2016.
  • Operation REASSURANCE refers to the military activities undertaken by the CAF since 2014 to support NATO assurance and deterrence measures in Eastern and Central Europe, aimed at reinforcing NATO’s collective defence and demonstrating the strength of Allied solidarity.

Contacts

Media Relations
Department of National Defence
Phone: 613-996-2353
Toll-Free: 1-866-377-0811
Email: mlo-blm@forces.gc.ca

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Russia’s new diesel-electric submarine arrives at home port Sevastopol

Alexei Pavlishak/TASS

Russia’s new diesel-electric submarine Krasnodar has arrived at its home base in Sevastopol (Crimea) for operation in the Black Sea Fleet after performing an inter-fleet passage and accomplishing missions in the Mediterranean Sea as part of the Russian Navy’s standing task force, TASS reports from the site.

“Today’s arrival of Krasnodar, a fourth submarine, in Sevastopol, is not only the arrival of a new submarine, but we can state now that a whole unit of submarines exists in Black Sea Fleet,” fleet’s Commander, Admiral Alexander Vitko, told reporters on Wednesday.

“Four submarines are in the Black Sea, two – in the Baltic Sea, and they will shortly start their passage to the home port,” he added.

Krasnodar’s passage has continued four months, which is a certain record for the Black Sea Fleet, the commander said, adding that in the future submarines will have longer passages.

As was reported in late June, the frigates Admiral Essen, Admiral Grigorovich and the submarine Krasnodar destroyed large arms depots of the Islamic State terrorist organization (outlawed in Russia) with six cruise missiles in Syria, delivering the strikes from the eastern portion of the Mediterranean Sea.

Alexei Pavlishak/TASS

The submarine had worked on interaction assignments as part of a multiple-type tactical group with two frigates.

A keel-laying ceremony for Project 636.3 diesel-electric submarine (SSK) Krasnodar took place on February 20, 2014 at the Admiralty Shipyard in St. Petersburg. The submarine was floated out on April 25, 2015.

The Project 636.3 (Varshavyanka-class) covers the third generation of diesel-electric submarines that are among the most noiseless underwater cruisers in the world.
They are capable of developing a surface speed of up to 20 knots and dive to a depth of 300 meters. They have a cruising capacity of 45 days and a crew of 52.

The Project 636.3 submarine displaces about 4,000 tonnes in its underwater position.

The first series of six such Project 636.3 Varshavyanka-class submarines have already been delivered to the Russian Black Sea Fleet.

Six Varshavyanka-class submarines for the Pacific Fleet are planned to be built before 2022.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HMCS Charlottetown sets sail for Europe and NATO SNMG1 integration

Royal Canadian Navy photo of HMCS Charlottetown

Royal Canadian Navy frigate HMCS Charlottetown left her homeport in Halifax and headed for Europe where she will join navy ships from several countries for a six-month deployment to NATO’s Standing Maritime Group 1.

On her second deployment under the Canadian Navy’s operation Reassurance, HMCS Charlottetown replaces HMCS St. John’s, which arrived in her home port of Halifax on July 17, 2017, after a six-month deployment.

During her first deployment in support of operation Reassurance, HMCS Charlottetown conducted maritime security operations and joint NATO training exercises between June 2016 and January 2017, in the North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean, Aegean and Baltic Seas, as part of Standing NATO Maritime Group Two (SNMG2).

HMCS Charlottetown is a Halifax-class frigate with a crew of approximately 240 personnel of all ranks, including an Enhanced Naval Boarding Party and a CH-124 Sea King helicopter air detachment.

“The highly trained and professional ship’s company is well prepared to meet the challenges of this mission,” HMCS Charlottetown commanding officer Commander Jeff Hutt said. “HMCS Charlottetown is committed to further increase the Canadian Armed Forces’ ability to work alongside our Allies, contribute to enhancing NATO readiness, and help strengthen international and regional stability.”