Tag: Jet

Arctic Fighter Meet 2017

The Swedish air force is hosting the 2017 Arctic Fighter Meet at the Flygvapnet air-base at Luleå, in the North of Sweden.

The meet is scheduled to take place from 21 to 25 August.

Swedish air Force Gripen fighters and F-16 fighters of the Norwegian air force will be joined by six F/A-18 Hornets and three Hawk-Jet training aircraft of the Ilmavoimat (Finnish Air Force). Cross Border Training (CBT) between Finland and Norway will take place during the exercise, to hone the skills of the pilots and test the air defence systems of the participating nations.

The aim of the exercise is to fly in accordance with the training programmes of the Norwegian, Swedish and Finnish Air Forces, increase reaction times through airspace incursion drills, as well as to educate newly qualified pilots in Joint-training missions and mission interoperability.

Similar exercises have been held since 2003. The aim is to strengthen defence cooperation in the Nordic countries (NORDEFCO) and to develop the international interoperability. The exercise promotes cooperation between the Nordic nations of NORDEFCO and NATO and is designed to integrate the training programmes of the participating countries and increase operational effectiveness.

For more information, contact the Chief of staff of the Lapland flight detachment Juri Kurttila, p. 0299 800 (vaihde).

 

Ilmavoimat

US fighter jet crash lands at Bahrain International Airport

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — A U.S. F/A-18 fighter jet suffering an engine problem crash landed Saturday at Bahrain International Airport and its pilot ejected from the aircraft after it ran off the runway, authorities said. The pilot escaped unharmed.

The crash disrupted flights to and from the island nation off the coast of Saudi Arabia that’s home to the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet. Images on social media showed the grey fighter jet’s nose tipped into the air but largely intact after what the Navy described as an “uncontrollable” landing.

The F/A-18 took off from the USS Nimitz, an aircraft carrier now in the Persian Gulf, said Cmdr. Bill Urban, a fleet spokesman. While in flight, the plane suffered an engine malfunction, forcing the pilot to divert, Urban said.

The pilot initially tried to land at Sheikh Isa Air Base in Bahrain, but instead ended up at the island’s commercial airport, Urban said.

“Due to the malfunction, the aircraft could not be stopped on the runway and the pilot ejected from the aircraft as it departed the runway,” the commander said in a statement.

Naval officials began an investigation into the crash and were trying to help the airport resume operations, Urban said. Bahrain’s Transportation and Telecommunications Ministry called the crash landing a “minor incident” in a statement and said flights resumed at the airport several hours later.

Bahrain hosts 8,000 U.S. troops, mostly sailors attached to a sprawling base called the Naval Support Activity. Officials at that facility oversee some 20 U.S. and coalition naval vessels in the Gulf providing security and others running anti-piracy patrols.

Bahrain is also home to an under-construction British naval base.

 

Navy Looks at Accelerating Super Hornet Transitions

Boeing F/A-18E Super Hornet

ARLINGTON, Va. — The Navy is looking at ways to accelerate the phase-out of F/A-18C “Classic” Hornet strike fighters from its carrier air wings and replacing the last few squadrons with F/A-18E Super Hornets, a Navy spokeswoman said.

“As we balance operational requirements and our initiatives to build the most capable and ready forward-deployed force, we are identifying the most efficient and effective way to safely transition the last four Navy operational Hornet squadrons to Super Hornets,” Cmdr. Jeannie Groeneveld, public affairs officer for commander, Naval Air Forces, said in an e-mail to Seapower.

“In order to provide our most capable warfighting force forward, the Navy began the first of the final transitions of our four operational F/A-18C Hornet squadrons to F/A-18E Super Hornet squadrons in July, with an expected completion in [fiscal] ’19. Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 131, was the first of the four squadrons to begin the transition last month.”

The other three F/A-18C squadrons, all based at Naval Air Station Oceana, Va., are VFA-34, VFA-37 and VFA-83.

“Accelerating the transition to Super Hornets will allow cost savings and reduce depot maintenance workload,” Groeneveld said. “As the Navy approaches the end of the extended service life for Hornets, the cost per flight hour continues to increase. Additionally, there are shortages in the Department of the Navy’s spare parts and supply system that have contributed to flight line readiness challenges, as well as our ability to extend the service lives of these airframes.”

She also said the transitions give the Navy the opportunity to select its best-condition Hornets for use by the Marine Corps and by Navy support and reserve units, such as Naval Aviation Warfighting Development Center, Fighter Composite Squadron 12, Reserve squadron VFA-204 and the Navy’s Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels.

The Navy is confident it will be able to continue to support all operational requirements as it completes transition of the Hornet fleet to Super Hornets,” she said.

Congress has supported the Navy’s requirements for increased Super Hornet procurement to bridge the gap to the fleet introduction of the F-35C Lightning II strike fighter. The first fleet squadron to make the transition to the F-35C will be VFA-147 in 2018.

 

Iranian Drone Interferes With USS Nimitz Flight Operations

An F/A-18E Super Hornet launches from the flight deck of the Aircraft Carrier USS Nimitz

MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla., Aug. 8, 2017 — While operating in international airspace in the central Persian Gulf, an F/A-18E Super Hornet with Strike Fighter Squadron 147, assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz, had an unsafe and unprofessional interaction with an Iranian QOM-1 unmanned aerial vehicle today, U.S. Central Command officials said.

Despite repeated radio calls to stay clear of active fixed-wing flight operations in vicinity of the USS Nimitz, the QOM-1 executed unsafe and unprofessional altitude changes in the close vicinity of an F/A-18E that was in a holding pattern and preparing to land on the aircraft carrier, officials said. The F/A-18E maneuvered to avoid collision with the QOM-1 resulting in a lateral separation between the two aircraft of about 200 feet and a vertical separation of about 100 feet.

The dangerous maneuver by the QOM-1 in the known vicinity of fixed-wing flight operations and at coincident altitude with operating aircraft created a collision hazard and is not in keeping with international maritime customs and laws, Centcom officials said.

This is the 13th unsafe or unprofessional interaction between U.S. and Iranian maritime forces in 2017, the officials noted.

 

Finnish training missions to be flown with the United States National Guard in August

International co-operation improves Finland’s defence capability and is part of the daily activities of the Air Force. The United States is an important partner for Finland, and training with the U.S. National Guard gives us an opportunity to draw best practices and share experiences.

Autumn 2015 marked the first time when Hawk jet trainers of the Finnish Air Force undertook training missions with A-10s from the United States.

The Finnish Air Force will carry out training missions with A-10 attack aircraft of the U.S. National Guard, focusing on air combat training and air-to-ground operations training. The flight operations will take place in Finnish and international airspace.

The participating A-10 attack aircraft belong to the 104th Fighter Squadron, part of the 175th Wing of the Maryland Air National Guard. They will be visiting Estonia for exercise purposes in August. The Finnish Air Force will be represented by F/A-18 Hornet multirole fighters and Hawk jet trainers, a total of six aircraft. Additionally, Army troops will take part in joint  air-to-ground operations training.

The flight operations will be conducted on weekdays between 8 am and 6 pm, mostly in designated exercise areas located in Southern Finland. Although the A-10s will mainly be using Estonian air bases during the exercise, individual aircraft will also visit FiAF bases.

The Finnish Air Force has flown training missions with Baltic-based detachments since 2015. In addition to the U.S. Armed Forces, the training missions have been participated by aircraft representing the Royal Air Force and the French and German Air Forces as well as detachments of the Swedish Air Force operating from their domestic bases. Autumn 2015 marked the first time when Hawk jet trainers of the Finnish Air Force undertook training missions with A-10s from the United States.

Further information: Tomi Böhm, LtCol, Commander of Fighter Squadron 31, Karelia Air Command, tel. +358 299 800 (operator)

Simulation shows F-35B in Shipborne Rolling Vertical Landing on HMS Queen Elizabeth [VIDEO]

Uniquely for a vessel of this type, it will be common to see the jump-jet F-35B appear to land conventionally.

This is a process called Shipborne Rolling Vertical Landing. It is a process designed to land jump-jet aircraft that uses both the vertical thrust from the jet engine and lift from the wings, thus maximising the payload an aircraft can return with and stopping the financial waste that comes with dropping expensive weaponry in the sea in order to land vertically.

 

Read more of this article by clicking on the link below: 

 

Russian Navy gets 2 new Sukhoi Su-30SMs, Kalibr Cruise Missiles, Torpedoes and a Corvette

Sovershenny Corvette Project 20380 was delivered to the Russian Navy on July 20.

Russia’s Navy received 60 cruise missiles Kalibr and 42 torpedoes from the manufacturers over the past three months, Deputy Defense Minister Yuri Borisov said on Wednesday.

“Two naval aircraft Sukhoi-30SM, more than 60 cruise missiles Kalibr and 42 torpedoes were provided for the Navy,” he said.

Also, he recalled that the flag-hoisting ceremony took place on The Sovershenny corvette of project 20380 on July 20. The ship built at the Amur shipyards was handed over to the Navy.

“On the acceptance list there are also three submarines, which have undergone repairs in docks, two raider boats, a pier of project 15163 and a large antisabotage boat,” Borisov said.

He recalled that on June 26 the nuclear powered submarine Yuri Dolgoruky of project 955 carried out a submerged launch of a ballistic missile Bulava to hit a target at the Kura proving ground in the Kamchatka Peninsula.

Source: TASS Russian News Agency.

 

Lockheed Martin receives contract for work on Israeli F-35s

Lockheed Martin is receiving an $8 million contract modification for logistical support of Israel’s F-35A Lightning II fighters.

The contract falls under the U.S. Department of Defense’s foreign military sales program and provides for maintenance, sustainment operations, supply chain management, work on the Automated Logistics Information system and training.

The work will be performed in Orlando, Fla., Greenville, N.C. and Fort Worth, Texas, with a projected completion date of Dec. 2017. Eight million dollars from the Foreign Military Sales program will be obligated.

Israel currently has five F-35s in service. Three fighters were delivered in April. Orders for 28 more have already been placed, with further procurement expected. They are not yet considered fully operational despite unconfirmed reports of their use in combat missions in Syria.

Israel was the first country under the Foreign Military Sales program to purchase the F-35. It is the first 5th generation stealth fighter to see service with the Israeli Air Force and is expected to form the backbone of their air superiority forces for the next 40 years.

The Israeli model of the F-35A is referred to as the Adir and has some features tailored for Israeli use. It is expected to replace much of Israeli F-15 and F-16 fighter fleets and provide a deep-strike option against heavy air defenses without the massive support needed by more conventional aircraft.

Source: UPI.

Pentagon: Chinese fighters intercepted US Navy spy plane

Two Chinese fighter jets performed a dangerous intercept of an American spy plane Sunday over the East China Sea, forcing the Navy EP-3 reconnaissance jet to maneuver to avoid a mid-air collision, a Pentagon spokesman said Monday.

The American pilots deemed the interaction with the Chinese J-10 jets “unsafe and unprofessional” after one of the fighters flew underneath the American plane at a high rate of speed before slowing down and pulling up into the EP-3’s flight path, said Navy Capt. Jeff Davis, a Pentagon spokesman. The Navy aircraft’s collision detection warning sounded and the pilot took “evasive action” to avoid the Chinese jet.

PLAAF Chengdu J-10A

The incident occurred late in the morning Sunday in international airspace, about 90 miles south of Qingdao, a Chinese port city north of Shanghai, Davis said.

The J-10 that performed the unsafe maneuver, essentially “cutting off” the American plane, flew within about 300 feet of the EP-3, a U.S. defense official said on condition of anonymity.

Davis said interactions with Chinese military aircraft are rarely unsafe.

“There are intercepts that occur in international airspace regularly,” Davis told reporters at the Pentagon. “The vast majority of them are conducted in a safe manner. This was the exception, not the norm.”

The incident followed two similar intercepts of American military aircraft by Chinese fighter jets in May.

Two Chinese J-10s performed an “unsafe and unprofessional” intercept of a Navy P-3 Orion over the South China Sea on May 24. One of the fighters maneuvered within 100 feet of the American plane off the coast of Hong Kong in that incident, the Pentagon said.

On May 18, Two Chinese Su-30 fighter jets intercepted an Air Force WC-135 Constant Phoenix, known as a “nuclear sniffer” plane, over the East China Sea. In that incident, one of the planes maneuvered with about 150 feet of the American plane, flying inverted above the WC-135, Pentagon officials said.

Source: Stars and Stripes.

 

Sweden can build a next generation fighter jet but Canada?

Defence Watch recently noted that Saab’s Gripen E, the next generation of that fighter jet, made its first flight on June 15. That is a major development for the plane. Deliveries are set for 2019.

Sweden and Brazil have purchased the Gripen E.

Sixty E models will be acquired by Sweden’s Air Force, while Brazil is buying 36 jets, including eight of the twin-seat F versions.

Ever since that item was published, I had been receiving the occasional email from some readers wondering why a country of Canada’s standing in the global aerospace industry (5th largest) can’t design and manufacture its own advanced fighter jet?

“How can Sweden with a population of fewer than 10 million people manage to design, build and sell a world-class fighter jet while Canada cannot?,” asked one reader.

An interesting question for sure.

 

Photo above: Gripen E in flight. Photo courtesy of Saab.

Source: Ottawa Citizen.