Tag: SNMG1

SNMG1 joins operation Sea Guardian in the Mediterranean

HNoMS Otto Sverdrup, Fridtjof Nansen-class frigate.

Breaking away from its usual duties in the North and Baltic Sea, NATO’s Standing Maritime Group 1 has sailed to the Mediterranean Sea where it will be contributing to the Mediterranean operation Sea Guardian.

Led by Norwegian frigate HNoMS Otto Sverdrup and commander Petter Kammerhuber, the SNMG1 will contribute to maritime situational awareness, counter-terrorism and capacity building in the region.

“Since we are now moving into the Mediterranean with NATO flags on the mast, it is natural that our eight vessels can contribute to the operation Sea Guardian,” said commander Petter Kammerhuber, who will be at the helm of SNMG1 through 2017.

“Some of our tasks include contributing to maritime situational awareness in the Mediterranean, protecting trade routes, deterring maritime terrorism and preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction,” Kammerhuber further said.

In addition to the Sea Guardian operation, SNMG1 will take part in a number of exercises and make several port calls.

 

NATO Maritime Commander and Frigate Group to visit Helsinki

Standing NATO Maritime Group 1 (SNMG1)

Allied Maritime Command Commander, Vice Admiral Clive Johnstone, will make an official visit to Finland beginning on 24 August 2017.

The visit will be hosted by the Chief of Finnish Navy, Vice Admiral Veijo Taipalus.

In conjunction with the Commander’s visit, Standing NATO Maritime Group 1 (SNMG1) will arrive in Helsinki August 25 for a scheduled port visit as part of the group’s deployment in the Baltic Sea. The group will be hosted by Coastal Fleet.

Finland is one of NATO’s most active partners and a valued contributor to NATO-led operations and missions – it is one of five countries that has enhanced opportunities for dialogue and cooperation with NATO.

The leadership discussions and port visit are a practical outcome of Finnish partnership with NATO in NATO’s Partnership for Peace program. The Commander’s visit allows for discussions on Finland’s maritime cooperation with NATO and the port visit provides an opportunity for sailors from the group to work with their Finnish counterparts to exchange information and enhance interoperability.

During the port visit, the SNMG1 command team will meet with local civilian and military leadership in Helsinki. The port visit is also a great opportunity for the sailors to enjoy a break from operations.

SNMG1 is currently composed of the NATO group flagship, Norwegian frigate HNoMS Otto Sverdrup, Canadian frigate HMCS Charlottetown, Portuguese frigate NRP Francisco de Almeida and German tanker FGS Rhön.

Some of the ships will be open and welcome visitors aboard both Saturday 26 August and Sunday 27 August from 13.00 to 16.00. The ships will be at Hernesaari Quay, Helsinki Harbor, Henry Fordin katu 5.

Security measures during open ship

For security reasons, the following is not allowed to be brought on board:

. Large bags, backpacks etc.

. Weapons or dangerous objects

. Cameras, cell phones, tablets, computers etc

All visitors and their baggage may be subject to search before entry.

 

HMCS Charlottetown supports NATO assurance and deterrence measures on Operation REASSURANCE

HMCS Charlottestown

News Release (UPDATE)

August 8, 2017 – Ottawa – National Defence / Canadian Armed Forces

Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Charlottetown joins Standing NATO Maritime Group One (SNMG1) today on its way to the Mediterranean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean, and Baltic Sea as part of Canada’s support to NATO assurance and deterrence measures in Central and Eastern Europe.

On its second deployment under Op REASSURANCE, HMCS Charlottetown replaces HMCS St. John’s, which arrived in its home port of Halifax on July 17, 2017, after a six-month deployment.

The deployment of HMCS Charlottetown demonstrates Canada’s ongoing commitment to international security and cooperation as part of NATO assurance and deterrence measures in Central and Eastern Europe.

“Canada’s participation in regional maritime security operations as part of NATO assurance activities is another demonstration of Canada’s ongoing commitment to international security and cooperation. The excellent crew of the HMCS Charlottetown is demonstrating our continued leadership on the world stage by making meaningful and enduring contributions to NATO activities in Eastern and Central Europe.”

—    Harjit S. Sajjan, Defence Minister 

“The highly trained and professional ship’s company is well prepared to meet the challenges of this mission. HMCS Charlottetown is committed to further increase the Canadian Armed Forces’ ability to work alongside our Allies, contribute to enhancing NATO readiness, and help strengthen international and regional stability.”

—    Commander Jeff Hutt, Commanding Officer, HMCS Charlottetown

Quick Facts

  • HMCS Charlottetown is a Halifax-class frigate with a crew of approximately 240 personnel of all ranks, including an Enhanced Naval Boarding Party and a CH-124 Sea King helicopter air detachment.
  • The Enhanced Naval Boarding Party provides a relatively new capability for the Royal Canadian Navy that is used in support of maritime interdiction operations.
  • HMCS Charlottetown’s deployment is part of a range of military activities undertaken by the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) to support NATO assurance and deterrence measures through the provision of military capabilities for training, exercises, demonstrations, and assigned NATO tasks and demonstrates Canada’s commitment to promote security and stability in Central and Eastern Europe.
  • During its first deployment in support of Op REASSURANCE, HMCS Charlottetown conducted maritime security operations and joint NATO training exercises between June 2016 and January 2017, in the North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean, Aegean and Baltic Seas, as part of Standing NATO Maritime Group Two (SNMG2).
  • The Standing NATO Maritime Groups are multinational, integrated maritime forces made up of vessels from various Allied countries. These vessels are made available to NATO to perform different tasks ranging from exercises to operational missions. They also help to establish Alliance presence, demonstrate solidarity, conduct routine diplomatic visits to different countries, support partner engagement, and provide a variety of maritime military capabilities to ongoing missions.
  • Commander Jeff Hutt, from Lunenberg, Nova Scotia, has served in the CAF since 1998. After his initial naval training, he was assigned to HMCS Charlottetown and was twice deployed with the ship to the Arabian Sea. On board HMCS Athabaskan, he served in Operation HESTIA, Canada’s response to the earthquake in Haiti. He was Chief of Staff to the Commander of Naval Reserves in Quebec City from July 2015 to December 2016.
  • Operation REASSURANCE refers to the military activities undertaken by the CAF since 2014 to support NATO assurance and deterrence measures in Eastern and Central Europe, aimed at reinforcing NATO’s collective defence and demonstrating the strength of Allied solidarity.

Contacts

Media Relations
Department of National Defence
Phone: 613-996-2353
Toll-Free: 1-866-377-0811
Email: mlo-blm@forces.gc.ca

Click on Flag

HMCS Charlottetown sets sail for Europe and NATO SNMG1 integration

Royal Canadian Navy photo of HMCS Charlottetown

Royal Canadian Navy frigate HMCS Charlottetown left her homeport in Halifax and headed for Europe where she will join navy ships from several countries for a six-month deployment to NATO’s Standing Maritime Group 1.

On her second deployment under the Canadian Navy’s operation Reassurance, HMCS Charlottetown replaces HMCS St. John’s, which arrived in her home port of Halifax on July 17, 2017, after a six-month deployment.

During her first deployment in support of operation Reassurance, HMCS Charlottetown conducted maritime security operations and joint NATO training exercises between June 2016 and January 2017, in the North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean, Aegean and Baltic Seas, as part of Standing NATO Maritime Group Two (SNMG2).

HMCS Charlottetown is a Halifax-class frigate with a crew of approximately 240 personnel of all ranks, including an Enhanced Naval Boarding Party and a CH-124 Sea King helicopter air detachment.

“The highly trained and professional ship’s company is well prepared to meet the challenges of this mission,” HMCS Charlottetown commanding officer Commander Jeff Hutt said. “HMCS Charlottetown is committed to further increase the Canadian Armed Forces’ ability to work alongside our Allies, contribute to enhancing NATO readiness, and help strengthen international and regional stability.”

 

Portuguese Navy frigate joining NATO’s SNMG1

Portuguese Navy photo of NRP Francisco de Almeida

Portuguese Navy frigate NRP Francisco de Almeida (F334) departed its homeport of Lisbon Naval Base on August 6 to join NATO’s standing maritime group 1 (SNMG1).

The former Karel Doorman-class frigate will join units from Canada, Netherlands, Denmark, Spain and Norway for operations in the North and Baltic Sea.

During the frigate’s time with SNMG1, the maritime group will be commanded by Norwegian Navy Commodore Petter Kammerhuber from aboard the flagship of the group, HNoMS Otto Sverdrup.

NRP Francisco de Almeida will be commanded Frigate captain João Pedro Monteiro da Silva who will have a crew of 188 at his disposal, including two boarding teams, a team of divers. The frigate also has an embarked Lynx helicopter on board.

The crew are set to return home on December 6.

NRP Francisco de Almeida is a former Karel Doorman frigate Portugal purchased from the Netherlands. The two countries signed a contract for two frigates in 2006 with former HNLMS Van Nes being renamed to NRP Bartolomeu Dias (F333) and transferred to Portugal in 2009 and former HNLMS Van Galen renamed to NRP Francisco de Almeida (F334) and transferred in 2010.

The 122 meter frigate is armed with the OTO Melara 76 mm gun, MK48 VLS-launched Sea Sparrow missiles, Harpoon anti-ship missiles, MK46 torpedoes and the Dutch Goalkeeper close-in weapon system (CIWS).

 

NATO’s SNMG1 gets new flagship, commander

HNoMS Otto Sverdrup is the new flagship of SNMG1. Photo: Royal Norwegian Navy.

Two Norwegian Navy Commodores traded places at the helm of NATO’s Standing Maritime Group 1 (SNMG1) during a change of command ceremony at the Norwegian Naval Base, Haakonsvern, on Friday.

Commodore Ole Morten Sandquis was relieved as Commander of SNMG1, by fellow countryman, Commodore Petter Kammerhuber.

At the same time, the flagship duty passed over from HNoMS Roald Amundsen to HNoMS Otto Sverdup – both are Fridtjof Nansen-class frigates in service with the Royal Norwegian Navy.

Since taking command on January 14, Sandquist, his staff and flagship HNoMS Roald Amundsen, operated in the Alliance`s area of responsibility in the North Atlantic with several other allied ships.

From the North Sea to the English Channel and the Baltic Sea to Iceland, the group participated in several multinational exercises and conducted continuous patrolling, providing the Alliance with immediate maritime capabilities and maritime situational awareness.

“It has been a great period of training and operations, and I trust that we have provided real Maritime Capability to NATO,” said Sandquist. “Units that have been a part of SNMG1 during this time have left the group with a higher state of readiness, and improved interoperability with Allies and partners.”

Norway is the command group lead of SNMG1 for the year of 2017, changing command mid-way.

Sandquist and Roald Amundsen leave the group after a busy program with a fair share of the time spent at sea, visiting 10 allies and partners in 17 ports.

Source: NAVALTODAY.

BALTOPS 2017 concludes

US Navy photo of ships sailing in formation during BALTOPS 2017.

NAVALTODAY, 17 June 2017

Some 50 ships from 14 nations concluded this year’s edition of BALTOPS 2017, the largest NATO exercise in the Baltic Sea, entering Kiel, Germany on Friday.

The U.S.-led drill saw participants hone their skills in air, surface, sub-surface, mine warfare and amphibious operations in the Baltic Sea.

“Exercise BALTOPS has provided us with valuable high-end training across the entire spectrum of naval warfare, and enhanced interoperability between Allies and Key Partners,” said Commander SNMG1, Commodore Ole Morten Sandquist (NOR). “Our presence and well executed exercises demonstrates that we are stronger together.

Commodore Sandquist commanded of one of five maritime task groups during the exercise. His task group was comprised of the two SNMG1 ships and four additional ships: US destroyer USS James E. Williams, Danish command and support ship HDMS Absalon, Swedish corvette HSwMS Nyköping, and Finnish minelayer FNS Hämeenmaa.

Finnish minelayer FNS Hämeenmaa.

Nations participating in BALTOPS included Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, the United Kingdom, the United States and NATO’s Enhanced Opportunities Partners: Finland and Sweden.

The ships’ arrival to Kiel coincided with the kick off of the city’s annual maritime festival. The German Navy is hosting forty ships and submarines from 13 nations at the Kiel navy base as part of the festival.

 

NATO’s annual BALTOPS navy exercise begins

The group’s flagship is the Royal Norwegian Navy’s HNoMS Roald Amundsen. Source (SNMG1 news release)

ERR.ee, By Dario Cavegn, 10 June 2017

The alliance’s Standing NATO Maritime Group One (SNMG1) is currently carrying out the annual BALTOPS exercise as part of the group’s deployment to the Baltic Sea. The exercise includes 40 ships from 14 allied and partner nations. The vessels left Szczecin in Poland on Sunday.

BALTOPS marks SNMG1’s third large multinational exercise this year, after the group participated in exercises off the coast of Norway in February, and off the coast of Scotland in March and April.

Held once a year, BALTOPS is an annual maritime-focused military exercise in the Baltic Sea region and one of the largest exercises in Northern Europe.

“We are very excited to take part in BALTOPS 2017. The exercise offers SNMG1 valuable high-end training across the entire spectrum of naval warfare, and provides a great arena to enhance interoperability and share best practices between Allies and Key Partners,” the commander of the group, Commodore Ole Morten Sandquist of the Royal Norwegian Navy, said.

The group has spent the last few weeks training with several allies and partners in the region. “After a successful pre-sail part in Szczecin, Poland, I look forward to commencing the at-sea phase of the exercise. BALTOPS 2017 provides SNMG1 with valuable training across several areas of expertise, such as air, surface, sub-surface, mine warfare and amphibious operations, and is a visible demonstration of NATO’s commitment to the region,” Sandquist said.

Sandquist’s group is currently composed of its flagship, the Norwegian frigate HNoMS Roald Amundsen, and the Dutch frigate HNLMS Evertsen.

HNLMS Evertsen F805

Sandquist is in command of one of five maritime task groups in BALTOPS. His task group is made up of the two ships of his group as well as four additional vessels, the U.S. Navy destroyer USS James E. Williams, the Danish command and support ship HDMS Absalon, the Swedish corvette HSwMS Nyköping, and the Finnish minelayer FNS Hämeenmaa.

U.S. Navy destroyer USS James E. Williams.
Danish command and support ship HDMS Absalon.
Swedish corvette K34 HSwMS Nyköping.
Finnish minelayer FNS Hämeenmaa.